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JOIN US for D4SD 2020 Design Jams

Scheduled for Apr 10 | Apr 17 | Apr 24 | May 1

Design for San Diego (D4SD) is a human-centered design challenge aimed at addressing important civic issues in our region. (Learn more at d4sd.org)

In light of COVID-19, our community faces new and unprecedented challenges. Businesses are struggling, educators are teaching online, individuals are dealing with new sources of stress, and many are home alone looking for ways to cope and help. As one way to provide support for our community in these trying times, D4SD is offering online collaborative design jams!

What is a Design Jam? A design jam is a fun, interactive session where we explore challenges and generate potential solutions using human-centered design. Learn the basics of design thinking through a live online course hosted by D4SD educators. Get practice with empathy building, research, problem framing, ideating, prototyping, and testing. Immerse yourself into the San Diego design community to hear from experts, take part in small group discussions, and meet potential collaborators for your own design efforts.
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Announcing Official Search for Faculty Director for the UC San Diego Design Lab

We seek a new director for the recently-established University of California, San Diego Design Lab, an international center where design can contribute to many issues and disciplines. This search is part of a major commitment by the University to weave design into the fabric of UCSD academic, research, and community life.

The Director will be expected (1) to oversee a program of impactful research, sustainable via educational programs, external funding, and/or other means; (2). to engage communities beyond the university; and, (3) to contribute to a climate of diversity, equity and inclusion.
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Focus on mobile health: Scientists develop app to diagnose, treat leishmaniasis

Photo courtesy of Centro Internacional de Entrenamiento e Investigaciones Medicas

Cutaneous leishmaniasis - caused by bites from infected sandflies - produces skin lesions that leave behind both scars and stigma that last a lifetime. Up to 1.2 million new cases are diagnosed each year across the 90 countries where the disease exists, including Colombia.

“Leishmaniasis happens where the medical system isn't," says Dr. Eliah Aronoff-Spencer, a Fogarty mHealth grantee at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). He's been working in rural Colombia to bridge the access gap between remote communities and the public health system, using a mobile tool that empowers community health workers to identify new cases of the disease and monitor treatment.
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Waste is an enormous problem. But recycling is the wrong solution.

Part 2 of a FastCompany editorial on Recycling by Don Norman

I am proud to be one of the developers of what is today called human-centered design. That is design that always starts off understanding the needs, capabilities, and desires of people. It has four basic principles, all four of which are being violated by today’s recycling craze.

Recycling is broken. There’s little clarity about what can and can’t be recycled, and the rules change from one city to the next, and sometimes even within the same city. According to the World Bank, we produce 1.4 billion tons of waste a year worldwide, a figure that’s expected to increase to 2.4 billion tons by 2025. Waste is an enormous problem that needs to be addressed if we’re going to prevent the worst effects of climate change. But recycling is the wrong solution.
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I’m an expert on complex design systems. Even I can’t figure out recycling.

Part 1 of a FastCompany editorial on Recycling by Don Norman

Recycling: The concept is pretty simple. Throw away stuff that can be melted down, chopped up, and made back into useful stuff. The problem is, I don’t understand how to do it.

For one, it’s difficult to find out what can and cannot be recycled. There are so many different kinds of paper goods, plastics, and metals, and worst of all, so many things that are combinations of materials or exotic new inventions of material science, that no list could possibly include every possible case. Secondly, the rules vary from location to location, and even at one location they can change from year to year. (“Check frequently with your recycler to see what their current requirements are,” reads one of the websites that tries to be helpful.)
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