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Benjamin Bergen

Design Lab member Benjamin Bergen featured as an expert in “History of Swear Words”

Design Lab member Benjamin Bergen featured as an expert in “History of Swear Words”

Design Lab member Benjamin Bergen featured as an expert in “History of Swear Words”

Design Lab member and UC San Diego Cognitive Science professor Benjamin Bergen was featured as an expert in “History of Swear Words,” a new Netflix comedy series exploring the usage of and science behind cursing. Bergen is the author of “What the F: What Swearing Reveals About Our Language, Our Brains, and Ourselves” and “Louder Than Words: The New Science of How the Mind Makes Meaning“.

Watch the full series now on Netflix!

Benjamin Bergen / Picture Credit: Netflix

Check out the trailer here:

Design Lab member and UC San Diego Cognitive Science professor Benjamin Bergen was featured as an expert in “History of Swear Words,” a new Netflix comedy series exploring the usage of and science behind cursing. Bergen is the author of “What the F: What Swearing Reveals About Our Language, Our Brains, and Ourselves” and “Louder Than Words: The New Science of How the Mind Makes Meaning“.

Watch the full series now on Netflix!

Benjamin Bergen / Picture Credit: Netflix

Check out the trailer here:

Design Lab member and UC San Diego Cognitive Science professor Benjamin Bergen was featured as an expert in “History of Swear Words,” a new Netflix comedy series exploring the usage of and science behind cursing. Bergen is the author of “What the F: What Swearing Reveals About Our Language, Our Brains, and Ourselves” and “Louder Than Words: The New Science of How the Mind Makes Meaning“.

Watch the full series now on Netflix!

Benjamin Bergen / Picture Credit: Netflix

Check out the trailer here:

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