skip to Main Content

Design Lab Launches City-Wide Civic Design Challenge

Design Lab Launches City-Wide Civic Design Challenge

Design Lab Launches City-Wide Civic Design Challenge

Calling all entrepreneurs, designers, engineers and problem solvers!

 

Register for the Kickoff and Information Session on Sept 21
Register for the 2017 D4SD Civic Design Challenge on Sept 22-23

In a combined effort to solve complex city problems through human-centered design and crowdsourcing, the University of California San Diego Design Lab has launched a city-wide civic design challenge called Design for San Diego (D4SD) with support from the City of San DiegoSCALE SD, the Design Forward Alliance, and the National Science Foundation.

Michèle Morris, Associate Director of The Design Lab and Design Forward founder stated that “The Design Lab is committed to applying human-centered design in real world contexts and integrating our efforts with existing civic and community initiatives in San Diego and beyond. D4SD is a fantastic platform on which to demonstrate design’s essential place in the innovation ecosystem and the value it can bring to complex sociotechnical issues like mobility. We are thrilled to be working with our regional and national partners on this initiative.”

This year’s D4SD challenge focuses on urban mobility. We all have places to go and people to see. So whether you’re traveling by car, bike, train, bus, boat or foot for work or play, mobility significantly affects millions of city goers everyday. Join D4SD for an unique opportunity to compete and collaborate with other city innovators to help solve the most pressing mobility-related issues facing our city. Participants will have opportunities to work and learn from UC San Diego Design Lab educators and the City of San Diego data science team to use their Open Data portal (data.sandiego.gov). The best solutions will earn cash prizes and private one-on-one meetings with city leaders and startup investors.

Steven Dow, assistant professor of cognitive science at UC San Diego who is directing D4SD as part of  the Qualcomm Institute-based Design Lab, said “D4SD presents a unique educational opportunity, both for university students and for the city’s residents – to gain hands-on experience with real-world issues and participate in San Diego’s innovation community.”

“A class that Dow taught at UC San Diego in the Spring quarter of 2017 helped identify the challenge topics, with students surveying San Diegans, attending meetups with city and community leaders, and conducting targeted interviews. Dow will also teach a Civic Design class this Fall, along with Postdoctoral Fellow Narges Mahyar and Research Scientist Colleen Emmenegger.  These students will take part in the challenge alongside the public signing up through the website. Mahyar said, “The course really seeks to blur the boundary between university students, residents, civic leaders, professional designers, and entrepreneurs.”

On September 21, join Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer, UC San Diego Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla and design icon and Design Lab Director and founder Don Norman for the kick-off and hackathon hosted by SCALE SD, the city’s newest smart-city accelerator, at Downtown Works.

On September 22-23, join other innovators to participate in design sprints, find teammates, build prototypes and win prizes. The final deadline for the challenge is Oct 24.

The official schedule for the D4SD Challenge is:

  • Thursday, September 21, 201710am – 1pm
    Kick-Off & Information Session
    Introduction by Mayor Faulconer, Chancellor Khosla & Don Norman
  • Friday, September 22, 2017:  5:30pm – all night
    D4SD Challenge: Design Sprint & Hackathon – Day 1
    Learn about the challenges, brainstorm, form teams & build prototypes
  • Saturday, September 23, 2017:  all day – 9pm
    D4SD Challenge: Design Sprint & Hackathon – Day 2
    Present prototypes, win prizes & party

Learn more at D4SD.org.

Calling all entrepreneurs, designers, engineers and problem solvers!

 

Register for the Kickoff and Information Session on Sept 21
Register for the 2017 D4SD Civic Design Challenge on Sept 22-23

In a combined effort to solve complex city problems through human-centered design and crowdsourcing, the University of California San Diego Design Lab has launched a city-wide civic design challenge called Design for San Diego (D4SD) with support from the City of San DiegoSCALE SD, the Design Forward Alliance, and the National Science Foundation.

Michèle Morris, Associate Director of The Design Lab and Design Forward founder stated that “The Design Lab is committed to applying human-centered design in real world contexts and integrating our efforts with existing civic and community initiatives in San Diego and beyond. D4SD is a fantastic platform on which to demonstrate design’s essential place in the innovation ecosystem and the value it can bring to complex sociotechnical issues like mobility. We are thrilled to be working with our regional and national partners on this initiative.”

This year’s D4SD challenge focuses on urban mobility. We all have places to go and people to see. So whether you’re traveling by car, bike, train, bus, boat or foot for work or play, mobility significantly affects millions of city goers everyday. Join D4SD for an unique opportunity to compete and collaborate with other city innovators to help solve the most pressing mobility-related issues facing our city. Participants will have opportunities to work and learn from UC San Diego Design Lab educators and the City of San Diego data science team to use their Open Data portal (data.sandiego.gov). The best solutions will earn cash prizes and private one-on-one meetings with city leaders and startup investors.

Steven Dow, assistant professor of cognitive science at UC San Diego who is directing D4SD as part of  the Qualcomm Institute-based Design Lab, said “D4SD presents a unique educational opportunity, both for university students and for the city’s residents – to gain hands-on experience with real-world issues and participate in San Diego’s innovation community.”

“A class that Dow taught at UC San Diego in the Spring quarter of 2017 helped identify the challenge topics, with students surveying San Diegans, attending meetups with city and community leaders, and conducting targeted interviews. Dow will also teach a Civic Design class this Fall, along with Postdoctoral Fellow Narges Mahyar and Research Scientist Colleen Emmenegger.  These students will take part in the challenge alongside the public signing up through the website. Mahyar said, “The course really seeks to blur the boundary between university students, residents, civic leaders, professional designers, and entrepreneurs.”

On September 21, join Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer, UC San Diego Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla and design icon and Design Lab Director and founder Don Norman for the kick-off and hackathon hosted by SCALE SD, the city’s newest smart-city accelerator, at Downtown Works.

On September 22-23, join other innovators to participate in design sprints, find teammates, build prototypes and win prizes. The final deadline for the challenge is Oct 24.

The official schedule for the D4SD Challenge is:

  • Thursday, September 21, 201710am – 1pm
    Kick-Off & Information Session
    Introduction by Mayor Faulconer, Chancellor Khosla & Don Norman
  • Friday, September 22, 2017:  5:30pm – all night
    D4SD Challenge: Design Sprint & Hackathon – Day 1
    Learn about the challenges, brainstorm, form teams & build prototypes
  • Saturday, September 23, 2017:  all day – 9pm
    D4SD Challenge: Design Sprint & Hackathon – Day 2
    Present prototypes, win prizes & party

Learn more at D4SD.org.

Calling all entrepreneurs, designers, engineers and problem solvers!

 

Register for the Kickoff and Information Session on Sept 21
Register for the 2017 D4SD Civic Design Challenge on Sept 22-23

In a combined effort to solve complex city problems through human-centered design and crowdsourcing, the University of California San Diego Design Lab has launched a city-wide civic design challenge called Design for San Diego (D4SD) with support from the City of San DiegoSCALE SD, the Design Forward Alliance, and the National Science Foundation.

Michèle Morris, Associate Director of The Design Lab and Design Forward founder stated that “The Design Lab is committed to applying human-centered design in real world contexts and integrating our efforts with existing civic and community initiatives in San Diego and beyond. D4SD is a fantastic platform on which to demonstrate design’s essential place in the innovation ecosystem and the value it can bring to complex sociotechnical issues like mobility. We are thrilled to be working with our regional and national partners on this initiative.”

This year’s D4SD challenge focuses on urban mobility. We all have places to go and people to see. So whether you’re traveling by car, bike, train, bus, boat or foot for work or play, mobility significantly affects millions of city goers everyday. Join D4SD for an unique opportunity to compete and collaborate with other city innovators to help solve the most pressing mobility-related issues facing our city. Participants will have opportunities to work and learn from UC San Diego Design Lab educators and the City of San Diego data science team to use their Open Data portal (data.sandiego.gov). The best solutions will earn cash prizes and private one-on-one meetings with city leaders and startup investors.

Steven Dow, assistant professor of cognitive science at UC San Diego who is directing D4SD as part of  the Qualcomm Institute-based Design Lab, said “D4SD presents a unique educational opportunity, both for university students and for the city’s residents – to gain hands-on experience with real-world issues and participate in San Diego’s innovation community.”

“A class that Dow taught at UC San Diego in the Spring quarter of 2017 helped identify the challenge topics, with students surveying San Diegans, attending meetups with city and community leaders, and conducting targeted interviews. Dow will also teach a Civic Design class this Fall, along with Postdoctoral Fellow Narges Mahyar and Research Scientist Colleen Emmenegger.  These students will take part in the challenge alongside the public signing up through the website. Mahyar said, “The course really seeks to blur the boundary between university students, residents, civic leaders, professional designers, and entrepreneurs.”

On September 21, join Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer, UC San Diego Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla and design icon and Design Lab Director and founder Don Norman for the kick-off and hackathon hosted by SCALE SD, the city’s newest smart-city accelerator, at Downtown Works.

On September 22-23, join other innovators to participate in design sprints, find teammates, build prototypes and win prizes. The final deadline for the challenge is Oct 24.

The official schedule for the D4SD Challenge is:

  • Thursday, September 21, 201710am – 1pm
    Kick-Off & Information Session
    Introduction by Mayor Faulconer, Chancellor Khosla & Don Norman
  • Friday, September 22, 2017:  5:30pm – all night
    D4SD Challenge: Design Sprint & Hackathon – Day 1
    Learn about the challenges, brainstorm, form teams & build prototypes
  • Saturday, September 23, 2017:  all day – 9pm
    D4SD Challenge: Design Sprint & Hackathon – Day 2
    Present prototypes, win prizes & party

Learn more at D4SD.org.

Read Next

How I Talked To My Daughter About Body Image

How I talked to my daughter-and myself-about body image

Design Lab member Shannon Master recently had her article published in TIME magazine's special edition on weight loss! Her work can be found on shelves across the nation from April 12 - July 12.

Below is an excerpt from Shannon's essay Does this mean I'm a real writer? where she discusses the article for TIME magazine.

"How I talked to my daughter-and myself-about body image...tackles important social issues surrounding body-image for young girls, their mothers, and women at large. It offers research on how mothers can not only help stop the cycle of negative body image in their young daughters, but also how moms as women themselves can work to improve their own body-image. I was surprised that the editors changed very little, except for the title, which is amazing considering this thing magically ejected itself out of me in a matter of days, rather than the weeks and months I can work on something that never sees the light of day. It looks pretty spiffy in its new home, complete with updated statistics and accompanying photos across an eight-page spread; eight pages of my words about how we can reframe our own body images as mothers, in order to help our girls have everything we never had—confidence and self-esteem with an unwavering sense of worth—in a frickn’ national publication."

Read more at shannonmaster.com
Don Norman On User-friendly Design

I wrote the book on user-friendly design. What I see today horrifies me

The world is designed against the elderly, writes Don Norman, 83-year-old author of the industry bible Design of Everyday Things and a former Apple VP.

More people than ever are living long, healthy lives. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the average life expectancy is 78.6 years for men and 81.1 for women. More relevant, however, is that as people grow older, their total life expectancy increases. So for those who are now 65, the average life expectancy is 83 for men and over 85 for women. And because I’m 83, I’m expected to live past 90 (but I’m aiming a lot higher than that). And these are averages, which means that perhaps half of us will live even longer.
Ailie Fraser UCSD Design Lab

Ailie Fraser Aims to Support People Doing Creative Tasks with Software

“There’s so much helpful content available now, but how can it be understood and consumed by a novice?” asks Ailie Fraser, a PhD graduate, “That’s what I’m interested in answering.” She is a part of a generation of upcoming design innovators, working collaboratively with The Design Lab. Her recently published dissertation aims to support people doing creative tasks with software specifically by leveraging resources generated by experts and bringing them into the context of people's workflows; in order to make them simpler to navigate and understand.

Fraser received her PhD from UCSD in Computer Science this past spring, and is now working full-time as a Research Engineer at Adobe Research. During her PhD, she completed three internships with Adobe Research. During her first internship, she focused on the domain of photo editing in Photoshop and addressed the problems novices experience when they begin to use the application. Due to the plethora of features and tools offered by the service, it can often be overwhelming to those unfamiliar with Photoshop.
Ford People-centered Automation

Ford Gifts $50K to Design Lab People-Centered Automation

Colleen Emmenegger, Head of People-Centered Automation at The Design Lab, was recently the recipient of a $50,000 grant from Ford Motor Company. The grant was awarded for her work regarding how drivers can understand, negotiate, and manage shared autonomy with their vehicles in a way that is accessible and easily translatable.

“We're trying to figure out if you can build a contract with the driver and her automated vehicle co-pilot so the driver knows exactly what they need to do and what the system does," says Emmenegger. "We're trying to build something that explicitly and continuously communicates, and that doesn't act as an invisible ‘controlling entity’ of the car. A system that provides dynamic, yet constant feedback to the driver and not sudden, startling warnings." 

Don Norman speaks on The Future of Design at the New School of Architecture

A crowd gathers as Don Norman prepares to speak on the Future of Design at the…

Waste Management

Waste is an enormous problem. But recycling is the wrong solution.

Part 2 of a FastCompany editorial on Recycling by Don Norman

I am proud to be one of the developers of what is today called human-centered design. That is design that always starts off understanding the needs, capabilities, and desires of people. It has four basic principles, all four of which are being violated by today’s recycling craze.

Recycling is broken. There’s little clarity about what can and can’t be recycled, and the rules change from one city to the next, and sometimes even within the same city. According to the World Bank, we produce 1.4 billion tons of waste a year worldwide, a figure that’s expected to increase to 2.4 billion tons by 2025. Waste is an enormous problem that needs to be addressed if we’re going to prevent the worst effects of climate change. But recycling is the wrong solution.
Back To Top