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Smart Streetlights

Community members call for end to ‘Smart Streetlights’ in San Diego

Community members call for end to ‘Smart Streetlights’ in San Diego

Community members call for end to ‘Smart Streetlights’ in San Diego

SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – More than a dozen community groups are calling on the City of San Diego to turn off thousands of cameras positioned on streetlights around San Diego.

The “Smart Streetlights” were approved by the San Diego City Council in December 2016, and there are currently 4,700 installed according to the city’s website.

Read more here.

SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – More than a dozen community groups are calling on the City of San Diego to turn off thousands of cameras positioned on streetlights around San Diego.

The “Smart Streetlights” were approved by the San Diego City Council in December 2016, and there are currently 4,700 installed according to the city’s website.

Read more here.

SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – More than a dozen community groups are calling on the City of San Diego to turn off thousands of cameras positioned on streetlights around San Diego.

The “Smart Streetlights” were approved by the San Diego City Council in December 2016, and there are currently 4,700 installed according to the city’s website.

Read more here.

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