skip to Main Content

UC San Diego Statement on Violence in Washington, DC

View Here

design lab connect2health national cancer institute

UC San Diego Design Lab Joins FCC, NCI to Champion Critical Role of Broadband in Rural Cancer Care

UC San Diego Design Lab Joins FCC, NCI to Champion Critical Role of Broadband in Rural Cancer Care

UC San Diego Design Lab Joins FCC, NCI to Champion Critical Role of Broadband in Rural Cancer Care

The Federal Communications Commission’s Connect2Health Task Force (C2HFCC) announced last week that the FCC and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have joined forces, signing a memorandum of understanding to focus on how increasing broadband access and adoption in rural areas can improve the lives of rural cancer patients.

As an inaugural project under the memorandum of understanding, the agencies have convened a public-private consortium to help bridge the broadband health connectivity gap in Appalachia, taking another concrete step toward closing the digital divide. The University of California San Diego Design Lab will lead coordination and intervention development for the consortium, partnering with the UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, the University of Kentucky’s Markey Cancer Center and Amgen.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Americans living in rural areas are still more likely to die of cancer than their counterparts in urban settings, which sets them apart from the many communities nationwide that have experienced a 20 percent decrease in cancer mortality over the past two decades.  Initial analysis of broadband data and cancer data shows that these rural “cancer hotspots” also face major gaps in broadband access and adoption, often putting promising connected care solutions far out of reach.

In Appalachia, the cancer picture is bleaker than in other rural parts of the country. Research from University of Virginia School of Medicine has shown that between 1969 and 2011, cancer incidence declined in every region of the country except rural Appalachia, and mortality rates soared.

“The quality, length and even value of life should not be determined by where you happen to be born or live,” said Michele Ellison, Chair of the Connect2HealthFCC Task Force.  “And yet that’s exactly what’s happening.  Nowhere is this more acutely felt than in the rural parts of our country.  Too many rural Americans suffer with late cancer diagnoses, unrelenting symptoms, and inadequate access to care.”

The project—titled L.A.U.N.C.H. (Linking & Amplifying User-Centered Networks through Connected Health): A Demonstration of Broadband-Enabled Health for Rural Populations in Appalachia—will target areas that face the dual challenge of higher cancer mortality rates and lower levels of broadband access. The initial geographic focus is planned for rural Kentucky. Highlighting the power of public-private collaborations, current project stakeholders include cancer experts, researchers, technologists and industry representatives from the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center (a NCI-designated cancer center), Amgen and the UC San Diego Design Lab.

Members of the UC San Diego team are led by Eliah Aronoff-Spencer, a professor in the UC San Diego School of Medicine, and include Design Lab Director Don Norman (a professor emeritus in the UC San Diego Department of Cognitive Science) as well as Prof. Kevin Patrick, Adjunct Prof. Jacqueline Kerr and Prof. Elena Martinez, all of the UC San Diego department of Family Medicine & Public Health. Aronoff-Spencer, Norman and Patrick are members of the Design Lab and all team members are affiliates of the UC San Diego Qualcomm Institute, where the Design Lab is based.

Dr. Aronoff-Spencer points out that “The Design Lab’s approach — Human-Centered Design — is especially well suited for the complex sociotechnical issues involved in healthcare in rural, underserved areas of the country. We start with observational studies and quantitative data fusion which drives mutual development of new procedures and technologies that can be prototyped, tested, integrated and further refined until they are ready to be deployed with our partners.”

“Through this strategic collaboration, we will work to bring the critical connectivity piece to the cancer puzzle,” continued Ellison. “Increasingly, broadband-enabled technologies are transforming the way cancer patients and survivors better manage, monitor, and treat their symptoms — helping them to live longer, better quality lives. But for rural Americans with limited access to broadband, many of these connected care solutions are unavailable.  Better connectivity holds the promise of bringing first class care and treatment to anyone, anywhere.”

“Research suggests that when patients report symptoms electronically to their care providers they are almost twice as likely to report improvements to health-related quality of life than those in a disconnected control group,” said Bradford Hesse, Ph.D., Chief, Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch, National Cancer Institute. “Electronically connected patients were also less likely to be admitted to the emergency room and had greater survival rates than patients in the control group. Collaborating with the FCC is a vital step for improving cancer outcomes for all Americans, regardless of where they live.”

The President’s Cancer Panel report, Improving Cancer-Related Outcomes with Connected Health, specifically urged more cross-sector collaboration among those in the healthcare, biomedical research, and technology fields as essential to the future of cancer care. Consistent with this blueprint, the multi-year, cross-sector L.A.U.N.C.H. project will focus on how broadband connectivity can be leveraged to improve symptom management for rural cancer patients, presenting a compelling case for greater deployment and adoption of broadband in rural areas.  Symptom management is one of the key priorities of the 2016 Blue Ribbon Panel, a group of scientific experts created to advise the National Cancer Advisory Board.

Additional information about the FCC-NCI memorandum and the broadband health demonstration project will be available online at https://www.fcc.gov/health/cancer.  Information about “critical need” counties at the intersection of broadband and health is available at https://www.fcc.gov/health/maps/priority-and-ruralpriority-2017.

The Connect2HealthFCC Task Force also encourages all stakeholders interested in broadband health projects for other critical need areas ― including fixed or mobile broadband providers, health technology companies, device manufacturers, and health care facilities ― to contact the Task Force via e-mail at engageC2H@fcc.gov. It would be useful for stakeholders to include information about broadband health needs and opportunities in particular critical need areas and offer concrete proposals on how they are seeking to address them via public-private partnerships or other models.

The Federal Communications Commission’s Connect2Health Task Force (C2HFCC) announced last week that the FCC and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have joined forces, signing a memorandum of understanding to focus on how increasing broadband access and adoption in rural areas can improve the lives of rural cancer patients.

As an inaugural project under the memorandum of understanding, the agencies have convened a public-private consortium to help bridge the broadband health connectivity gap in Appalachia, taking another concrete step toward closing the digital divide. The University of California San Diego Design Lab will lead coordination and intervention development for the consortium, partnering with the UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, the University of Kentucky’s Markey Cancer Center and Amgen.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Americans living in rural areas are still more likely to die of cancer than their counterparts in urban settings, which sets them apart from the many communities nationwide that have experienced a 20 percent decrease in cancer mortality over the past two decades.  Initial analysis of broadband data and cancer data shows that these rural “cancer hotspots” also face major gaps in broadband access and adoption, often putting promising connected care solutions far out of reach.

In Appalachia, the cancer picture is bleaker than in other rural parts of the country. Research from University of Virginia School of Medicine has shown that between 1969 and 2011, cancer incidence declined in every region of the country except rural Appalachia, and mortality rates soared.

“The quality, length and even value of life should not be determined by where you happen to be born or live,” said Michele Ellison, Chair of the Connect2HealthFCC Task Force.  “And yet that’s exactly what’s happening.  Nowhere is this more acutely felt than in the rural parts of our country.  Too many rural Americans suffer with late cancer diagnoses, unrelenting symptoms, and inadequate access to care.”

The project—titled L.A.U.N.C.H. (Linking & Amplifying User-Centered Networks through Connected Health): A Demonstration of Broadband-Enabled Health for Rural Populations in Appalachia—will target areas that face the dual challenge of higher cancer mortality rates and lower levels of broadband access. The initial geographic focus is planned for rural Kentucky. Highlighting the power of public-private collaborations, current project stakeholders include cancer experts, researchers, technologists and industry representatives from the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center (a NCI-designated cancer center), Amgen and the UC San Diego Design Lab.

Members of the UC San Diego team are led by Eliah Aronoff-Spencer, a professor in the UC San Diego School of Medicine, and include Design Lab Director Don Norman (a professor emeritus in the UC San Diego Department of Cognitive Science) as well as Prof. Kevin Patrick, Adjunct Prof. Jacqueline Kerr and Prof. Elena Martinez, all of the UC San Diego department of Family Medicine & Public Health. Aronoff-Spencer, Norman and Patrick are members of the Design Lab and all team members are affiliates of the UC San Diego Qualcomm Institute, where the Design Lab is based.

Dr. Aronoff-Spencer points out that “The Design Lab’s approach — Human-Centered Design — is especially well suited for the complex sociotechnical issues involved in healthcare in rural, underserved areas of the country. We start with observational studies and quantitative data fusion which drives mutual development of new procedures and technologies that can be prototyped, tested, integrated and further refined until they are ready to be deployed with our partners.”

“Through this strategic collaboration, we will work to bring the critical connectivity piece to the cancer puzzle,” continued Ellison. “Increasingly, broadband-enabled technologies are transforming the way cancer patients and survivors better manage, monitor, and treat their symptoms — helping them to live longer, better quality lives. But for rural Americans with limited access to broadband, many of these connected care solutions are unavailable.  Better connectivity holds the promise of bringing first class care and treatment to anyone, anywhere.”

“Research suggests that when patients report symptoms electronically to their care providers they are almost twice as likely to report improvements to health-related quality of life than those in a disconnected control group,” said Bradford Hesse, Ph.D., Chief, Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch, National Cancer Institute. “Electronically connected patients were also less likely to be admitted to the emergency room and had greater survival rates than patients in the control group. Collaborating with the FCC is a vital step for improving cancer outcomes for all Americans, regardless of where they live.”

The President’s Cancer Panel report, Improving Cancer-Related Outcomes with Connected Health, specifically urged more cross-sector collaboration among those in the healthcare, biomedical research, and technology fields as essential to the future of cancer care. Consistent with this blueprint, the multi-year, cross-sector L.A.U.N.C.H. project will focus on how broadband connectivity can be leveraged to improve symptom management for rural cancer patients, presenting a compelling case for greater deployment and adoption of broadband in rural areas.  Symptom management is one of the key priorities of the 2016 Blue Ribbon Panel, a group of scientific experts created to advise the National Cancer Advisory Board.

Additional information about the FCC-NCI memorandum and the broadband health demonstration project will be available online at https://www.fcc.gov/health/cancer.  Information about “critical need” counties at the intersection of broadband and health is available at https://www.fcc.gov/health/maps/priority-and-ruralpriority-2017.

The Connect2HealthFCC Task Force also encourages all stakeholders interested in broadband health projects for other critical need areas ― including fixed or mobile broadband providers, health technology companies, device manufacturers, and health care facilities ― to contact the Task Force via e-mail at engageC2H@fcc.gov. It would be useful for stakeholders to include information about broadband health needs and opportunities in particular critical need areas and offer concrete proposals on how they are seeking to address them via public-private partnerships or other models.

The Federal Communications Commission’s Connect2Health Task Force (C2HFCC) announced last week that the FCC and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have joined forces, signing a memorandum of understanding to focus on how increasing broadband access and adoption in rural areas can improve the lives of rural cancer patients.

As an inaugural project under the memorandum of understanding, the agencies have convened a public-private consortium to help bridge the broadband health connectivity gap in Appalachia, taking another concrete step toward closing the digital divide. The University of California San Diego Design Lab will lead coordination and intervention development for the consortium, partnering with the UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, the University of Kentucky’s Markey Cancer Center and Amgen.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Americans living in rural areas are still more likely to die of cancer than their counterparts in urban settings, which sets them apart from the many communities nationwide that have experienced a 20 percent decrease in cancer mortality over the past two decades.  Initial analysis of broadband data and cancer data shows that these rural “cancer hotspots” also face major gaps in broadband access and adoption, often putting promising connected care solutions far out of reach.

In Appalachia, the cancer picture is bleaker than in other rural parts of the country. Research from University of Virginia School of Medicine has shown that between 1969 and 2011, cancer incidence declined in every region of the country except rural Appalachia, and mortality rates soared.

“The quality, length and even value of life should not be determined by where you happen to be born or live,” said Michele Ellison, Chair of the Connect2HealthFCC Task Force.  “And yet that’s exactly what’s happening.  Nowhere is this more acutely felt than in the rural parts of our country.  Too many rural Americans suffer with late cancer diagnoses, unrelenting symptoms, and inadequate access to care.”

The project—titled L.A.U.N.C.H. (Linking & Amplifying User-Centered Networks through Connected Health): A Demonstration of Broadband-Enabled Health for Rural Populations in Appalachia—will target areas that face the dual challenge of higher cancer mortality rates and lower levels of broadband access. The initial geographic focus is planned for rural Kentucky. Highlighting the power of public-private collaborations, current project stakeholders include cancer experts, researchers, technologists and industry representatives from the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center (a NCI-designated cancer center), Amgen and the UC San Diego Design Lab.

Members of the UC San Diego team are led by Eliah Aronoff-Spencer, a professor in the UC San Diego School of Medicine, and include Design Lab Director Don Norman (a professor emeritus in the UC San Diego Department of Cognitive Science) as well as Prof. Kevin Patrick, Adjunct Prof. Jacqueline Kerr and Prof. Elena Martinez, all of the UC San Diego department of Family Medicine & Public Health. Aronoff-Spencer, Norman and Patrick are members of the Design Lab and all team members are affiliates of the UC San Diego Qualcomm Institute, where the Design Lab is based.

Dr. Aronoff-Spencer points out that “The Design Lab’s approach — Human-Centered Design — is especially well suited for the complex sociotechnical issues involved in healthcare in rural, underserved areas of the country. We start with observational studies and quantitative data fusion which drives mutual development of new procedures and technologies that can be prototyped, tested, integrated and further refined until they are ready to be deployed with our partners.”

“Through this strategic collaboration, we will work to bring the critical connectivity piece to the cancer puzzle,” continued Ellison. “Increasingly, broadband-enabled technologies are transforming the way cancer patients and survivors better manage, monitor, and treat their symptoms — helping them to live longer, better quality lives. But for rural Americans with limited access to broadband, many of these connected care solutions are unavailable.  Better connectivity holds the promise of bringing first class care and treatment to anyone, anywhere.”

“Research suggests that when patients report symptoms electronically to their care providers they are almost twice as likely to report improvements to health-related quality of life than those in a disconnected control group,” said Bradford Hesse, Ph.D., Chief, Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch, National Cancer Institute. “Electronically connected patients were also less likely to be admitted to the emergency room and had greater survival rates than patients in the control group. Collaborating with the FCC is a vital step for improving cancer outcomes for all Americans, regardless of where they live.”

The President’s Cancer Panel report, Improving Cancer-Related Outcomes with Connected Health, specifically urged more cross-sector collaboration among those in the healthcare, biomedical research, and technology fields as essential to the future of cancer care. Consistent with this blueprint, the multi-year, cross-sector L.A.U.N.C.H. project will focus on how broadband connectivity can be leveraged to improve symptom management for rural cancer patients, presenting a compelling case for greater deployment and adoption of broadband in rural areas.  Symptom management is one of the key priorities of the 2016 Blue Ribbon Panel, a group of scientific experts created to advise the National Cancer Advisory Board.

Additional information about the FCC-NCI memorandum and the broadband health demonstration project will be available online at https://www.fcc.gov/health/cancer.  Information about “critical need” counties at the intersection of broadband and health is available at https://www.fcc.gov/health/maps/priority-and-ruralpriority-2017.

The Connect2HealthFCC Task Force also encourages all stakeholders interested in broadband health projects for other critical need areas ― including fixed or mobile broadband providers, health technology companies, device manufacturers, and health care facilities ― to contact the Task Force via e-mail at engageC2H@fcc.gov. It would be useful for stakeholders to include information about broadband health needs and opportunities in particular critical need areas and offer concrete proposals on how they are seeking to address them via public-private partnerships or other models.

Read Next

UCSD Trolley Station

UCSD to create grand entrance to manage crushing growth, and welcome the public

"To see eyes looking at you matters. One pair of those eyes may give you a job offer, or help finance your startup, or help buy your first product off Kickstarter, or convince you what you’re doing isn’t solving real problems." — Scott Klemmer, Design Lab

In one of the biggest physical and social changes in school history, UC San Diego will create its first “front door,” a grand entrance meant to appeal as much to the public as students and ease crowding on a campus where enrollment could hit 40,000 this fall.
Plans are being drafted for a gateway that will blend art, culture, entertainment, dining, education and research — the same mix that helps funnel people from Westwood Village to UCLA.
Design Lab Cat Hicks Signalio

Cat Hicks Q&A: A Conversation about Google & her new start-up Signal IO

The Design Lab has long lasting impacts. Catherine Hicks has seen the Design Lab since its…

Design Lab Neema Mahdavi Natasha Tan Sharon Carmichael Oz Chen Erwin Hines
Design Lab Ucsd Elderly

Design for older people sucks. Here are four ways to fix it

Digital Arts editorial with Stefan Sagmeister and Design Lab Director Don Norman on designing for sixty-somethings.

Beginning in May, Alive Ventures launched a series of ongoing panels titled “Old People are Cool, Design for Them Sucks”, aiming to open up a discussion with the design community on how to better design for older adults. John Zapolski, founder of Alive Ventures, and design thought leader Ayse Birsel of Birsel + Seck, hosted the series of discussions, with guests including design luminaries such as Stefan Sagmeister and Don Norman.

“When I would visit him in retirement homes, I would see people who needed walkers and wouldn’t use them because it was a stigma,” said Norman. “They were so ugly and it sort of shouts out to the world, ‘Hey I’m old and crippled and therefore probably feeble minded as well,’ right? Well no, it’s wrong. And so I noticed that, but I didn’t pay much attention until I myself reached my eighties and started looking at my friends and other things and realised that, yes, people shunned a lot of things that are being made to help them because they don’t like to admit publicly they have problems.” - Don Norman
Ucsd Logo Design Lab

Design Lab statement on protests, violence following George Floyd’s death

The Design Lab stands in solidarity with the Black community in the fight against racial injustice. We condemn all acts of police brutality and violence that led to the recent murders of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade, David McAtee, and countless other members of the Black community.

We condemn all acts of discrimination. We fully support the Black Lives Matter movement and their efforts to bring justice, healing, and freedom to Black people across the globe. We recognize that these acts of violence are deeply rooted in a history of systemic racism, and we understand that design plays a large role in influencing whether our structures and technologies support or further oppress people of color. We vow to use our platform, position, and privileges to fight for a more equitable future. 
Design Lab Vineet Pandey Gut Instinct Hde

Trust your Gut: Vineet Pandey and Team win First Prize at HDE Conference

How much do we actually know about our gut microbiome? A lot more than we…

Back To Top