Skip to content

SPUR Team 11

SPUR Team 11

SPUR Team 11

SPUR TEAM 11

The project report addresses the critical need to assist undergraduate students, faculty, and staff in obtaining paid research opportunities to enhance their experience and readiness for research.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

How might we help undergraduate students, faculty, and staff get paid for research opportunities to increase opportunities, expand their experience, and improve research readiness.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

It identifies widespread funding shortfalls, the necessity for fair student compensation, funding needs for staff, challenges posed by a competitive job market, and the impact of limited financial support on the diversity of applicant pools. Special attention is given to the challenges faced by ethnically diverse students, first-generation students, STEM and non-STEM students, and students of varied gender identities and sexual orientations, highlighting the unique difficulties each group faces in accessing research opportunities.

DEFINE

Key insights include the importance of funding to enable meaningful research opportunities and the critical role of student engagement in increasing awareness and ease of application for research positions. The report evolves from focusing on generating revenue to a broader consideration of effectively accessing and utilizing available resources to improve research opportunities and readiness.

Updated Problem Statement

How can we create a robust system that enables students, faculty, and staff to seamlessly apply for and access funding dedicated to research opportunities, fostering growth in the number of available opportunities, enhancing experiential learning, and ultimately improving the research readiness of the academic community

DEVELOP

The action phase emphasizes the need to create accessible funding channels, enhance the research program experience, and leverage resources to improve research readiness. Moving forward, the project prioritizes the development of effective funding mechanisms, boosting engagement and accessibility, and adopting an integrated approach to maximize the impact of the initiatives.

Summary and Key Takeaways

In summary, the report advocates for a robust system that facilitates access to dedicated research funding, aiming to expand the number of opportunities available, enrich experiential learning, and ultimately enhance the research readiness of the academic community.

Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further understand a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Michael Sailor, Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • Vaibhav Bommisetty, Student, Data Science
  • Ethan Han, Student, Computer Science
  • Mark Morera, Student, Cognitive Science
  • Harris Dalal, Business/Economics, Junior Designer Program
Team 11 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

SPUR TEAM 11

The project report addresses the critical need to assist undergraduate students, faculty, and staff in obtaining paid research opportunities to enhance their experience and readiness for research.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

How might we help undergraduate students, faculty, and staff get paid for research opportunities to increase opportunities, expand their experience, and improve research readiness.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

It identifies widespread funding shortfalls, the necessity for fair student compensation, funding needs for staff, challenges posed by a competitive job market, and the impact of limited financial support on the diversity of applicant pools. Special attention is given to the challenges faced by ethnically diverse students, first-generation students, STEM and non-STEM students, and students of varied gender identities and sexual orientations, highlighting the unique difficulties each group faces in accessing research opportunities.

DEFINE

Key insights include the importance of funding to enable meaningful research opportunities and the critical role of student engagement in increasing awareness and ease of application for research positions. The report evolves from focusing on generating revenue to a broader consideration of effectively accessing and utilizing available resources to improve research opportunities and readiness.

Updated Problem Statement

How can we create a robust system that enables students, faculty, and staff to seamlessly apply for and access funding dedicated to research opportunities, fostering growth in the number of available opportunities, enhancing experiential learning, and ultimately improving the research readiness of the academic community

DEVELOP

The action phase emphasizes the need to create accessible funding channels, enhance the research program experience, and leverage resources to improve research readiness. Moving forward, the project prioritizes the development of effective funding mechanisms, boosting engagement and accessibility, and adopting an integrated approach to maximize the impact of the initiatives.

Summary and Key Takeaways

In summary, the report advocates for a robust system that facilitates access to dedicated research funding, aiming to expand the number of opportunities available, enrich experiential learning, and ultimately enhance the research readiness of the academic community.

Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further understand a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Michael Sailor, Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • Vaibhav Bommisetty, Student, Data Science
  • Ethan Han, Student, Computer Science
  • Mark Morera, Student, Cognitive Science
  • Harris Dalal, Business/Economics, Junior Designer Program
Team 11 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

SPUR TEAM 11

The project report addresses the critical need to assist undergraduate students, faculty, and staff in obtaining paid research opportunities to enhance their experience and readiness for research.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

How might we help undergraduate students, faculty, and staff get paid for research opportunities to increase opportunities, expand their experience, and improve research readiness.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

It identifies widespread funding shortfalls, the necessity for fair student compensation, funding needs for staff, challenges posed by a competitive job market, and the impact of limited financial support on the diversity of applicant pools. Special attention is given to the challenges faced by ethnically diverse students, first-generation students, STEM and non-STEM students, and students of varied gender identities and sexual orientations, highlighting the unique difficulties each group faces in accessing research opportunities.

DEFINE

Key insights include the importance of funding to enable meaningful research opportunities and the critical role of student engagement in increasing awareness and ease of application for research positions. The report evolves from focusing on generating revenue to a broader consideration of effectively accessing and utilizing available resources to improve research opportunities and readiness.

Updated Problem Statement

How can we create a robust system that enables students, faculty, and staff to seamlessly apply for and access funding dedicated to research opportunities, fostering growth in the number of available opportunities, enhancing experiential learning, and ultimately improving the research readiness of the academic community

DEVELOP

The action phase emphasizes the need to create accessible funding channels, enhance the research program experience, and leverage resources to improve research readiness. Moving forward, the project prioritizes the development of effective funding mechanisms, boosting engagement and accessibility, and adopting an integrated approach to maximize the impact of the initiatives.

Summary and Key Takeaways

In summary, the report advocates for a robust system that facilitates access to dedicated research funding, aiming to expand the number of opportunities available, enrich experiential learning, and ultimately enhance the research readiness of the academic community.

Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further understand a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Michael Sailor, Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • Vaibhav Bommisetty, Student, Data Science
  • Ethan Han, Student, Computer Science
  • Mark Morera, Student, Cognitive Science
  • Harris Dalal, Business/Economics, Junior Designer Program
Team 11 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

Read Next

Steven Rick on Designing for Healthcare | Design Chats


Steven Rick, Graduate Student at UC San Diego, shares his approach and experiences when designing for healthcare and how design can improve doctor-patient relationships.

Design Chats is a video series where we sit down with design practitioners to answer questions about how they utilize human-centered design.

View our Design Chats playlist on the Design Lab YouTube Channel

Design Lab Launches City-Wide Civic Design Challenge

Calling all entrepreneurs, designers, engineers and problem solvers!   Register for the Kickoff and Information…

Designathon

Designing UC San Diego’s New Trolley Stop | Pepper Canyon Mobility Hub Designathon Video

Watch the 14-minute Pepper Canyon Mobility Hub Designathon Video

Over 250 UC San Diego students, neighbors, and future transit users gathered on April 6-7, 2019 for the first-ever Designathon: an intensive, immersive event where interdisciplinary teams design solutions for real-world challenges. This Designathon focused on the Pepper Canyon Station, which aspires to be an ecologically, socially, and technologically friendly mobility hub on the UCSD campus, set to open in 2020.

Executive Producer: Michele Morris
Producers & Directors: Stephanie Sherman, Ash Eliza Smith, Ian Strelsky
Camera Operators: Clint Evangelista, Qiyi Fan, Alice Medrano, Steven Phung, Yimeng Sun
Editors: Steven Phung, Yimeng Sun
Story Consultant: Griffin Middelson
Animators: Weilun Yao, Lilly Gee
Sound Designers: Steven Phung
Music Composers: Remy Rose, Riain Hager, Forrest Reid
Daniel Suh Designer-in-residence

Meet Designer-in-Residence & Data Analyst Daniel Suh

Daniel Suh has always been passionate about creating partnerships to uplift others. While he was an undergraduate at UC San Diego’s Thurgood Marshall College, he founded one of the university’s first student consulting organizations, Cornerstone Community Consultants, which provides pro-bono opportunities for students to empower the local community. Suh also established UCSD’s first chapter of International Justice Mission, a student-led organization that centers around human rights, anti-human trafficking, and law enforcement. "Growing up in an underprivileged community, I've discovered a passion for social justice and contributing to causes larger than myself," Suh says.
Seda Evis

Designer in Residence: Seda Evis

While Seda Evis participates as a Designer-in-Residence at UC San Diego with The Design Lab, and is VP of Strategy & Growth at FreshForm Interactive—an experience design and innovation consultancy—she also claims to have what she refers to as a superpower: her hybrid mind, which she describes as the combination of two worlds: the business side and the design side.

As a Designer-in-Residence at The Design Lab,  Evis enjoys working in an interdisciplinary setting, which she says enhances her existing skillset. “Academia tends to be quite separate from how the practice is done,” she explains. “I find ways of doing interdisciplinary work, as well as cross industry work, very important for innovation because that’s how you actually get seeds from different places.” As of now, most of Evis’s work at The Design Lab has been working with the Community Team on the now winning bid for the World Design Capital 2024 (WDC) designation. Her work dovetails with her role on the Board of  Directors for the Design Forward Alliance–a non-profit organization started by the Lab in partnership with the regional design community and one of the partners co-leading the HOME 2024 WDC efforts alongside the Design Lab, Burnham Center for Community Advancement, the City of San Diego and the City of Tijuana.   The designation puts the San Diego-Tijuana region in a prestigious international cohort recognized for the “effective use of design to drive economic, social, cultural and environmental development.”  Even the proposal theme is significant, Evis says. “Home” not only refers to the immense and diverse communities of San Diego and Tijuana that form one, but also serves as an acronym for Human-centered, Open, Multi-disciplinary/Multi-cultural, and Experimental. For Evis, participating in HOME2024 signifies her career “coming full circle.” 

Steven Dow And His Team Tackle Innovation In Crowdsourcing

As part of the Design Lab's graduate course work on Crowdsourcing taught by Steven Dow, students…

Back To Top