skip to Main Content
design lab michael meyer ignite business

Michael Meyer Highlights Design-Driven Innovation in Business

Michael Meyer Highlights Design-Driven Innovation in Business

Michael Meyer Highlights Design-Driven Innovation in Business

Read the article below Michael Meyer’s presentation below or skip ahead to the bottom for audio of the entire presentation.

The Design Lab’s Michael Meyer recently presented a talk on “Design-Driven Innovation: Building the Team, Building the Company” at the UC San Diego Ignite Conference. The annual Ignite conference hosted by UCSD Office of Innovation and Commercialization, brings together students, faculty, alumni and staff from universities in the greater CaliBaja area and includes startup teams; partner organizations; and regional entrepreneurs and experts. The one-day UCSD-based conference is dedicated to hands-on learning and engagement through thematic tracks with targeted breakout sessions, pitch competitions, a regional startup and resource fair, mentoring hours and networking events.

During his presentation, Meyer explained how design-driven companies use design thinking and qualitative research to support their business and customer base. As a result of using the design thinking process, design-driven businesses are able to capture vision, innovation and inspiration from their employees as a team to produce more thoughtful and insightful solutions and products.

Meyer referred to the “double diamond” model created by the UK Design Council, as where the design-thinking process exists. The double diamond shape outlines there is a divergence on what the problem is, followed by a convergence on what the problem really is, leading to a divergence on how to solve the problem and a convergence on what is the right solution. Meyer explained that while most businesses focus on the second half of the diamond model, the first part is critical to design thinking.

As an example of situation where a business benefitted from design thinking, Meyer described a recent scenario where a company employed a design thinking team to address a major plummet in candy bar sales. While most of the company executives assumed that their loss in sales was due to an increase in competitor granola bar sales and their healthy appeal, the design-thinking team decided to look at the issue holistically. As a result, the company avoided a major pitfall. The design team found that the loss in sales had nothing to do with healthier food choices. Instead, they found that drivers were no longer eating as much on their ride to work and more often talking on the phone. So instead of choosing to hold a granola bar or candy bar, they were choosing to hold mobile phones. And so the design thinking team began to assist the company in finding ways to keep drivers entertained the way a mobile phone does.

While highlighting the importance of design thinking, Meyer also noted that the design-thinking process falls a little bit short because it overlooks the need for practitioner expertise and intuition to help plan and guide businesses. He stressed that design thinking tends to minimize the role of design in the rest of the enterprise and downplays the complexity of company culture. On the other hand, he also noted that design-driven companies have transformed their culture and their way of working by fully integrating design mindsets and skillsets into their organization. In sum, Meyer explained that as a result of applying the design-thinking process, design driven companies are more (1) diverse, (2) individually high-performing, (3) inclusive and collaborative, and (4) connected across the enterprise.

To listen to the whole presentation go here:

Read the article below Michael Meyer’s presentation below or skip ahead to the bottom for audio of the entire presentation.

The Design Lab’s Michael Meyer recently presented a talk on “Design-Driven Innovation: Building the Team, Building the Company” at the UC San Diego Ignite Conference. The annual Ignite conference hosted by UCSD Office of Innovation and Commercialization, brings together students, faculty, alumni and staff from universities in the greater CaliBaja area and includes startup teams; partner organizations; and regional entrepreneurs and experts. The one-day UCSD-based conference is dedicated to hands-on learning and engagement through thematic tracks with targeted breakout sessions, pitch competitions, a regional startup and resource fair, mentoring hours and networking events.

During his presentation, Meyer explained how design-driven companies use design thinking and qualitative research to support their business and customer base. As a result of using the design thinking process, design-driven businesses are able to capture vision, innovation and inspiration from their employees as a team to produce more thoughtful and insightful solutions and products.

Meyer referred to the “double diamond” model created by the UK Design Council, as where the design-thinking process exists. The double diamond shape outlines there is a divergence on what the problem is, followed by a convergence on what the problem really is, leading to a divergence on how to solve the problem and a convergence on what is the right solution. Meyer explained that while most businesses focus on the second half of the diamond model, the first part is critical to design thinking.

As an example of situation where a business benefitted from design thinking, Meyer described a recent scenario where a company employed a design thinking team to address a major plummet in candy bar sales. While most of the company executives assumed that their loss in sales was due to an increase in competitor granola bar sales and their healthy appeal, the design-thinking team decided to look at the issue holistically. As a result, the company avoided a major pitfall. The design team found that the loss in sales had nothing to do with healthier food choices. Instead, they found that drivers were no longer eating as much on their ride to work and more often talking on the phone. So instead of choosing to hold a granola bar or candy bar, they were choosing to hold mobile phones. And so the design thinking team began to assist the company in finding ways to keep drivers entertained the way a mobile phone does.

While highlighting the importance of design thinking, Meyer also noted that the design-thinking process falls a little bit short because it overlooks the need for practitioner expertise and intuition to help plan and guide businesses. He stressed that design thinking tends to minimize the role of design in the rest of the enterprise and downplays the complexity of company culture. On the other hand, he also noted that design-driven companies have transformed their culture and their way of working by fully integrating design mindsets and skillsets into their organization. In sum, Meyer explained that as a result of applying the design-thinking process, design driven companies are more (1) diverse, (2) individually high-performing, (3) inclusive and collaborative, and (4) connected across the enterprise.

To listen to the whole presentation go here:

Read the article below Michael Meyer’s presentation below or skip ahead to the bottom for audio of the entire presentation.

The Design Lab’s Michael Meyer recently presented a talk on “Design-Driven Innovation: Building the Team, Building the Company” at the UC San Diego Ignite Conference. The annual Ignite conference hosted by UCSD Office of Innovation and Commercialization, brings together students, faculty, alumni and staff from universities in the greater CaliBaja area and includes startup teams; partner organizations; and regional entrepreneurs and experts. The one-day UCSD-based conference is dedicated to hands-on learning and engagement through thematic tracks with targeted breakout sessions, pitch competitions, a regional startup and resource fair, mentoring hours and networking events.

During his presentation, Meyer explained how design-driven companies use design thinking and qualitative research to support their business and customer base. As a result of using the design thinking process, design-driven businesses are able to capture vision, innovation and inspiration from their employees as a team to produce more thoughtful and insightful solutions and products.

Meyer referred to the “double diamond” model created by the UK Design Council, as where the design-thinking process exists. The double diamond shape outlines there is a divergence on what the problem is, followed by a convergence on what the problem really is, leading to a divergence on how to solve the problem and a convergence on what is the right solution. Meyer explained that while most businesses focus on the second half of the diamond model, the first part is critical to design thinking.

As an example of situation where a business benefitted from design thinking, Meyer described a recent scenario where a company employed a design thinking team to address a major plummet in candy bar sales. While most of the company executives assumed that their loss in sales was due to an increase in competitor granola bar sales and their healthy appeal, the design-thinking team decided to look at the issue holistically. As a result, the company avoided a major pitfall. The design team found that the loss in sales had nothing to do with healthier food choices. Instead, they found that drivers were no longer eating as much on their ride to work and more often talking on the phone. So instead of choosing to hold a granola bar or candy bar, they were choosing to hold mobile phones. And so the design thinking team began to assist the company in finding ways to keep drivers entertained the way a mobile phone does.

While highlighting the importance of design thinking, Meyer also noted that the design-thinking process falls a little bit short because it overlooks the need for practitioner expertise and intuition to help plan and guide businesses. He stressed that design thinking tends to minimize the role of design in the rest of the enterprise and downplays the complexity of company culture. On the other hand, he also noted that design-driven companies have transformed their culture and their way of working by fully integrating design mindsets and skillsets into their organization. In sum, Meyer explained that as a result of applying the design-thinking process, design driven companies are more (1) diverse, (2) individually high-performing, (3) inclusive and collaborative, and (4) connected across the enterprise.

To listen to the whole presentation go here:

Read Next

Grand Entrance Design And Innovation Building

UC San Diego breaks ground on first piece of its historic ‘grand entrance’ project

"Design should attack critical societal problems, such as disease, homelessness, a lack of food and access to education,” Innovation involves finding ways to implement change, to get things done." - Don Norman, Design Lab Director

UC San Diego on Thursday broke ground on the $67 million Design and Innovation Building, the first piece of the “grand entrance,” a sweeping project that’s meant to provide a clear, dynamic doorway for the county’s largest university.

The 74,000-square-foot building will provide everything from classrooms to studios to makers space for the school’s small but fast-growing design and innovation programs.
Announcing The New Graduate Student Specialization In Human-centered Design

Announcing the new Graduate Student Specialization in Human-centered Design

Image courtesy of Adobe Stock

Announcing the new Graduate Student Specialization in Human-centered Design in partnership with the UC San Diego Design Lab, Cognitive Science (CogSci), Computer Science and Engineering (CSE), and Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science (HWSPH).

The Design Graduate Specialization is a set of courses graduate students can choose to take that fit into their home degree program requirements. It is analogous to receiving a minor, but at the graduate level. The courses fit into their home program as either electives or as courses that were already part of their core requirements, plus the option to take courses from other programs taking part in the specialization outside of their home program. In addition, students will be required to take at least one course that explicitly addresses and discusses issues of power, privilege, and ethical responses. The Design Graduate Specialization is created so that it can be integrated into a one or two-year Master program or a Ph.D. program.

Nazima Ahmad is Putting People Over Profits by Connecting Art and Design at the Design Lab

If the COVID-19 pandemic has taught us anything, it’s that our communities are more important than ever. The pandemic has changed the ways in which we experience and perceive community—sometimes even causing us to feel that it has vanished. The past two years have been an uncertain time for those involved in the arts, with many creative professionals being impacted by dwindling audiences and interest. Nazima Ahmad, a Designer-in-Residence at The Design Lab, noticed the crumbling connection between artists and consumers and sought to find a way to mend it. Working with fellow designer Michelle Hoogenhout, the two were able to come up with City Canvas, a concept developed in collaboration with the Arts and Commission Department of the City of San Diego that won the 2020 SCALE San Diego Urban Innovation Challenge that works to make connecting with local artists easier for San Diego residents.

“Working with the city on that project was all-around trying to figure out how to promote the creative economy of San Diego,” says Ahmad of the goal of the project. Not only was the project a great success at Design Week, but it is also what led Ahmad to The Design Lab.
UC San Diego Receives Community-Engaged Research Grant

UC San Diego Receives Community-Engaged Research Grant

Design Lab Member Lilly Irani has been awarded the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation Community-Engaged Research Grant. This funding will assist the United Taxi Workers San Diego team in their community-engaged research on community-accountable, employee-driven technology entrepreneurship in San Diego.

“We’re excited to support community engagement in the research process through this grant portfolio. These six projects aim to build equitable, collaborative, solution-driven initiatives between communities and researchers with the potential to advance inclusive prosperity through entrepreneurship.” — Chhaya Kolavalli, Senior Program Officer, Knowledge Creation & Research, Entrepreneurship

The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation is a private, nonpartisan foundation based in Kansas City, Mo., that seeks to build inclusive prosperity through a prepared workforce and entrepreneur-focused economic development. The Foundation uses its $3 billion in assets to change conditions, address root causes, and breakdown systemic barriers so that all people–regardless of race, gender, or geography–have the opportunity to achieve economic stability, mobility, and prosperity. For more information, visitwww.kauffman.org and connect with us at www.twitter.com/kauffmanfdn and www.facebook.com/kauffmanfdn.
Don Norman Emphatic Design

Why I Don’t Believe in Empathic Design

Human-centered design pioneer Don Norman, who coined the term ‘user experience,’ explains why he’s not convinced by the current obsession with empathy and what we should do instead.

I approve of the spirit behind the introduction of empathy into design, but I believe the concept is impossible, and even if possible, wrong. The reason we often talk about empathy in design is that we really need to understand the people that we’re working for. The idea is that, essentially, you’re in a person’s head and understand how they feel and what they think.
Ucsd Logo Design Lab

Message from Don Norman on Power and Prejudice

A message from Don Norman, Director of the Design Lab, regarding the protests, violence following George Floyd’s death
Back To Top